Rug Weaving 101

In my quest to buy less stuff, recycle the stuff I have, and rekindle the abilities that seem to have been lost to the generations, I decided (following a small flood) that I was going to try to weave a rug. Sure, I could definitely run out to some store and buy a replacement, or (the old me) would have bought one on Amazon. Instead, I decided to put to use a giant piece of wool that I bought (for no particular reason other than that I liked the colour) in Sweden. I’ve been vaguely using it as a decorative blanket for years, so it was time to give it a new life.

I can say, honestly, that the rug looks a lot better in real life than it does in the images, it’s a little wonky and definitely has a hand-made feel, which I love. It’s super thick and warm and is like having a sweater for the floor.

I started by building a loom out of a 1×3″, which I drilled 2 5/8″ holes into and pounded nails every inch. I inserted two 5′ dowels and pulled old acrylic yarn (yellow) between the nails. Boom, I had a loom. I did a test weave using 1″ strips of wool and the result was more like flower petals than the chunky knit-like weave that I wanted. So after some experimentation, I decided to start again and this time used 1/2″ strips which rolled and worked much better. Much more cushion-ey, and more of what I wanted.

After weaving until I ran out of wool, I removed the entire thing from the loom, tied off the ends, and then used a lighter colour wool to weave the end loops together along the long end and bind off the short end. I used some amazing red yarn that I bought at Labour and Wait in London (and has been taking up space for ages), to blanket stitch the binding at the end (and hide a multitude of yellow yarn.) Overall, not bad for an experiment and one I will definitely re-visit again.

The finished rug, installed.
The finished rug with bound edges.
Weaving underway.
Weaving, just getting started.
I decided to start over, because this one was too flat… don’t worry, I’ll re-use it to make another rug.

Making progress and experimenting with sneaking in some extra fabrics.

Getting started with attempt #1, which (as you can see above) I abandoned and started over.

Cutting strips. I started by cutting 1” strips, which were too unruly.

The Death of Architecture, Part 1.

Sad artificiality and fabricated environs (which, frankly, wasn’t even accurate for the season.)

I consider myself reasonably well-read when it comes to architectural thought leaders, from starchitects to historic luminaries to future-forward theorists. However, after reading Vanishing New York, something has happened to me, a sudden and dramatic shift in perspective that feels as if I am enlightened in a completely different way and feels like waking up after having been part of a self-perpetuating, self-worshiping cult of architects for the past 20 years. I’ve written several recent posts that have skirted this issue, but never one that tackles it directly, because the feeling has never been as clear as it is at present.

The final shoe dropped for me this past week when I stopped by the reconstructed Bjarke Ingels Serpentine Pavilion in Toronto. The unfortunately titled— “unzipped” —exhibition occupies what appears to be a disused courtyard on King Street West just outside the theatre-ish district of Toronto. The much touted reconstruction is sponsored by Westbank, the Canadian real estate development firm known for employing signature architects to design signature buildings across Canada.

Bjarke Ingels Unzipped Serpentine Pavillion Toronto Westbank
Unzipped Brochure

Every year since 2000 the Serpentine Gallery in London has commissioned a temporary summer pavilion by a leading architect. The series presents the work of an international architect or design team who has not completed a building in England at the time of the Gallery’s invitation. Past luminaries have included Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel, Peter Zumthor, Herzog & de Meuron, Socar Niemeyer, Álvaro Siza, Ai Weiwei, and—of course—Bjarke Ingels. Each Pavilion is completed within six months and is situated on the Gallery’s lawn for three months for the public to explore and is then deconstructed and only in rare instances makes an encore appearance somewhere else in the world.

Like a good architectural soldier and without hesitation, I somewhat robotically and unquestioningly planned a visit the reconstructed pavilion, armed with my “ticket” and iPhone in hand, ready to take photos of the structure at jaunty angles to post on my Instagram feed.

The pavilion was about 2 storeys tall.

Inside the pavilion.

Immediately upon my arrival, I was struck by the artificiality of the pavilion and its contextual environment, in terms of materiality, in terms of manufactured context, and in terms of faux authenticity. As I sat on the plastic turf lawn staring at the giant pile of epoxy “blocks”, I couldn’t help but take notice John Andrews’ CN tower peeking out above it. The CN tower remains one of the largest human-made structures in the Northern Hemisphere, and it’s an impressive engineering and construction feat despite the fact that the tower turned 45 this year. As I gazed at the tower in the distance, I wondered… why was I sitting on plastic turf, surrounded by plastic shrubs looking at a plastic structure that was really just there an advertisement for a company that is trying to convince the general populace that (yet) another new condo tower would be a great addition to King Street West? Is this plastic fabrication the avant garde (or perhaps worse, the future) of architecture? Has (capital A) Architecture simply devolved into a red-light district for celebrity designers working in the service of commerce and commercialism? Is this the best we can do?

Even the “tickets” (necessary for entry past the security guard [who was so unbelievably haughty and othering {and her outfit so impeccably tailored} that there is no way in hell that she can be an actual security worker, she (and her impeccable makeup) simply must have been from central casting]) were artificial. The entire ticketing process is simply a mechanism for Westbank to subscribe visitors to an endless stream of e-mails and direct marketing. No exaggeration, I’ve received about 30 e-mails from them since Wednesday. (I’m writing this on the following Sunday.) And also no exaggeration, though I had a “ticket” there seemed to be very little demand for entry and there wasn’t a soul ahead of me in line.

I left the pavilion feeling disappointed and sad and wondering… Is this it? Is this what I’ve spent the last 20 years of my life studying, researching, and teaching, and if so… What’s next?

Blocks.

The pavilion with the CN Tower in the background.

Foundation.

Life without Amazon. The quiescence of a shopper, and early adopter.

For as long as I can remember, I have been a shopper. I like to shop, to find things that are curious and interesting, and that will improve the quality of my every day life.

However, over the past few years, I have come to the conclusion that I have more than I could ever possibly need. I have two bicycles, an entire home office full of all kinds of machinery, every iPhone ever made and nearly every iPad, an extra kitchen full of dishes, pots, and pans and a closet that could clothe a small army. As I do more reading about Döstädning (Swedish Death Cleaning), I recognize that recreational shopping whittles away a nest egg and re-feathers the nest with stuff. The funny thing: anyone walking into my house would say that I’m both a minimalist and well organized, both of which are true. I can’t imagine how other people must feel if I feel like I’m drowning in stuff and most people that I know have way more stuff than I do!

Regardless, the issue is multifaceted: foremost, whittling down the amount of possessions that I have and secondly, shopping responsibly.

For decades, my mantra was that if it didn’t fit in one carload, then I didn’t need it. Those were the days when I moved frequently (college, Boston, grad school, multiple apartments, new jobs, etc.) and the thought of packing, schlepping, and unpacking became less and less tenable and remaining lean and facile was far more desirable. Somewhere along the way, I lost that sensibility, and it seemed to slide into my life around the same time Amazon Prime became a thing.

You can read all about the reasons Amazon Prime is a dreadful idea all across the internet.

For some odd reason, despite my being a militant, David Horowitz-trained and Sy Syms-proud educated consumer, and decades-long Wal*Mart basher, it never occurred to me to think about Amazon. Amazon was convenient, cheap, and magically, things showed up at my door. I bought in hook, line, and sinker for years—to the point where I actually had the Amazon magic buttons all over my house—just push to replenish, and magically a few days later a new supply of whatever I needed magically showed up at my door. UPS deliveries were, for nearly a decade, a daily (and sometimes twice daily) occurrence at my house.

And then abruptly, I stopped.

I was walking down the commercial high-street in my neighborhood that has for the last fifty years been a vibrant strip of mom-and-pop stores and restaurants, and realized that it had escaped my notice that about 60% of the shops were closed. About half of those that remained catered to things I would never have occasion to use: tattoos, vaping shops, cheap cell phones, eyebrow waxing. Where were all the amazing bookshops that I remember so fondly, and the t-shirt shop, and the poster shop, and the kitchen shop, and the little gift shop, and the stationery store, and the little plant shop/florist, and so many others? 

Vibrant neighborhoods like this one where my Dad grew up were once the norm all across this country.

The realization hit me like a ton of bricks (and mortar stores). While I had been lazily shopping online and having things delivered—daily—to my door, my neighborhood and my neighbors who owned businesses in it, had unraveled. And I hadn’t left the house long enough to notice. How could this be? For the past 20 years, I have never set foot in a Wal*Mart, and I go out of my way to educate friends and family about the damage Wal*Mart has done to our economy, our urban fabric, our suburban fabric. How could I have so blindly missed the damage that Amazon is doing… and how much worse the damage is.

I was ashamed, and sorry, because I realize that the economic damage will take years to remedy. While my own city angled for Amazon HQ2, it seemingly escaped us all that Amazon is not only resetting the entire economy, but also eviscerating the neighborhoods in which we live. We likely won’t take full notice (like so many things) until it is too late. All of these observations were reinforced by the evidence presented in the amazing book, Vanishing New York by Jeremiah Moss. The moral of his book: wake up and pay attention, because once it’s gone, it’s too late to lament its passing.

So, I made a solemn and immediate pledge: No more Amazon, I will make a concerted effort to shop at locally-owned shops. My first move was to ditch my Kindle and replace it with a Kobo Reader which allows me to borrow books from a number of local libraries. So far, the results of my life without Amazon are promising, I haven’t purchased a single item on Amazon in over six months, and I’ve met some amazingly interesting people in my neighborhood. The fellow that works at the hardware store knows a lot about replacing screens, and offered me some outstanding advice on how (and when) to replace screens to keep bugs from getting in. My friend John who owns Elmwood Pet Supplies makes deliveries, which makes buying food from him even more convenient than using Amazon. The lady who works at the gift shop, Neo, on the corner made some wonderful suggestions for a wedding gift that I needed to buy, and she wrapped it beautifully. Sunshine + Bluebirds has these amazing wraps that I’ve bought for everyone I know, and they also giftwrap beautifully. I learned that I can buy an organic, locally-raised chicken for my mom for only $4 at Stearns, which means that the only reason I need to stop by Whole Foods (also owned by Amazon) is to steal the packets of Sir Kensigntons Mustard to use in my lunch. (No, I’m not joking.)

So, all in all, I find myself buying less, making more informed buying choices, and doing more for my local economy. So far, a win-win, (except for Amazon). And when Amazon loses, we all gain. Be aware, your choices have consequences, shop wisely.

Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong

For decades, the medical community has ignored mountains of evidence to wage a cruel and futile war on fat people, poisoning public perception and ruining millions of lives. It’s time for a new paradigm.

An outstanding article about being fat. Worth a read for everyone, regardless of what you think of your body type.

Source: Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong

Un-bullshitting.

Over the past 10 months, I have carefully examined the role of technology and social media in my life. On the balance, I have determined that most social media—Facebook, blogging, commenting on news stories, Snapchat and legions of others—is way too much work and actually denigrates an overall quality of life. I took a long hiatus from writing this blog, because doing so makes me feel vulnerable to crazy and pathetic people that “live” through their existence on the internet, rather than actually existing in “real” life. 

One of many changes.

About a year ago, my father gave me a stack of coupons for Harbor Freight. I had never heard of the store, but apparently, their schtick is giving away merchandise. Each week, the store publishes about a dozen coupons that entice potential customers to come in to the store and grab freebies. Curiously, I took the bait. Standing in a line of about 20 customers, all with the same free merchandise in hand (a multimeter, a small Philips screwdriver set, a package of 2mil drop cloths and a package of zip ties), bored out of my mind, I began to study the fellow standing in line in front of me. He had on a hat from a local school that had his first name embroidered across the side of it.

√ First name 

√ University student or grad, and university name

√ Approximate hight and weight 

He waited patiently, free products in hand, and wallet in the other. His wallet was open, so I could see both his license and Visa debit card.

√ Last name

√ Middle name

√ Home address

√ Bank (and if he had a Visa debit, that meant that his account is likely a checking account at that bank.)

√ Visa card number

√ License Number (and NYS License restriction B, which means that he is a contact lens wearer, because he wasn’t wearing glasses at the time.)

√ Date of Birth

He approached the counter, and the kindly older cashier (who was clearly having some difficulty with the archaic computer) asked him to type his phone number into the keypad on the credit card terminal.

√ Phone Number

That didn’t work, so the cashier asked him his e-mail address.

√ e-mail address

After the cashier entered all of his merchandise, the fellow removed the Visa debit card from his wallet, and swiped it. He chose to pay as debit (as opposed to credit) and I watched him put in his PIN number. I also noticed the work ID card that was in his wallet underneath his Visa debit card.

√ Workplace

√ Occupation

√ PIN for his debit card, and likely the same number used for withdrawing cash at the ATM.

That’s a huge amount of information to garner by a casual observation over the course of about 7 minutes. I didn’t look him up online, but a cursory search online will reveal more information like the names of family members, partners, ex-partners, and neighbors, and their ages. Facebook usernames (which are plainly evident in the web address for each and every Facebook profile), and scads of other data are available through a quick Google search (a company that also captures information about what I’m searching for, how frequently, and draws conclusions about me based on my activity… I’ve switched to Duck Duck Go who pledges not to track you). It’s a scary proposition to know that that information is not only bought and sold by companies like Facebook and other “data aggregators” to compile a comprehensive profile of our consumer behaviors, our propensity to make charitable donations, and our personal habits. I’ve said many times on this blog that we are not the users of social media, we are the commodity product that is used by giant corporations to make more and more money at the expense of our privacy. These same corporations have eviscerated our economy, our communities, and are changing the social fabric of our country and the world. Yes, social media provides a means to stay connected, and that’s a great thing… but at what cost? What good is staying connected if the means of doing so makes us lazy, disassociated consumers of the lives of our family and friends rather than active participants in the vivid tapestry of life that surrounds us. Our reliance on social media is translating into a twisted trope: helicopter parenting our own social lives, insulating ourselves from dissent, debate, and dimension, padding ourselves with simplicity, similarity, and safety. Meanwhile, we’re being stalked and used by corporations collecting data about us as they use our behaviors to manipulate us, destroy the commercial fabric of our cities and towns, and fleece us into believing our lives are “easier” as a result.

After some significant reflection, none of this is something that I want to contribute to.

Life is difficult, disorderly, messy, and complex. Simplicity, convenience, and leisure come at a cost. It’s time for me to stop blindly participating, and start actively engaging.

So, moving forward, you’ll notice a few changes to this blog:

Facebook has been iced. No more commenting through Facebook, no more publishing posts to Facebook. If you’re too lazy to check this blog from time to time, then you probably don’t deserve to read what I write.

Amazon links are no more. As Amazon continues to rot our consumer economy from the inside out, I have taken a 6-month hiatus from Amazon, and I’ve never been happier (look for a separate post about this soon.) 

Privacy is key. Feel free to comment. Remember that what you post in comments is available to the world… all the people that like you, and all the people that you don’t. Moving forward, commenting on this blog requires you to sign up for a WordPress account. I find WordPress and Automattic to be a reasonably responsible company. 

So, if you’re in, you’re in, welcome back. Bookmark this site and check back periodically. You can also subscribe by adding your e-mail address to the little “subscribe” box on the left. We won’t use your e-mail (or even look at it) for anything except to send you a copy of the newest post to this blog. You’ll find some thought-provoking writing, and less bullshit, and if that’s too much work, then it’s been nice having you as a reader.

Happy 4th Birthday, Florence!

airstream Bambi aluminum

It’s difficult to believe that I forgot to wish Florence a happy 4th birthday, because she and I share one! So, a happy belated birthday to Florence! The best home away from home anyone could know. It’s also tough to believe that Florence has been in our lives for four years, it seems like an eternity, and buying her seems like yesterday at the same time.

Florence is going to have some new adventures in the upcoming months, so despite the near radio silence on this blog, be sure to stay tuned to find out more about what she will be up to.

Flo’s new flow.

After a long hiatus, Flo has gotten some attention! 

Normal flow.

As I’ve been end-of-summer cleaning and doing maintenance around Flo, one of the things that has really been bothering me was the apparent ice damage that happened last winter. After mistakenly leaving the “shore” water on, the water system seemed to freeze. At first inspection, the damage seemed severe: the regulator was shot, the toilet valve was shot, the kitchen faucet froze so solidly that it split down the middle. 

Upon discovering the problem, I panicked and turned off every valve I could find, including two under the dinette next to the fresh water tank. I turned the water off and lamented the damage, but didn’t do much about it… using a long hose and bottled water for a while.

This past May, I bought a replacement kitchen faucet from Lowe’s that was almost the exact same as the original that came with the Airstream, only it was made by Pfister rather than Moen. 

After several months of tripping over the box, worrying about the faucet, and avoiding the installation for some reason today, I took the leap and installed it.

I thought, I’ll get the old one off (at least) and then just “see” how the new one looks in place.

Getting the old faucet off was a bear. the Moen faucet seemed to be held by some invisible force that wouldn’t budge no matter what I did. After about an hour of patient work, I got it completely off, and had just a hole in the counter top. 

Shockingly, the Pfister faucet was ridiculously easy to install. The box contained little adapter that you screw into the hot and cold water feeds, and then the entire thing just snaps together, literally. Click, click, click, tighten up the bolt that holds the thread faucet in place and boom, done.

I recommend the Pfister faucet, though I did have to call the 800 number at one point to ask a quick question and it was closed at 7pm, eastern time. I didn’t love that. I figured out the answer to my question though, and didn’t need their help after all. 

It also turned out that the “valves” that I was turning “off” weren’t really water feed valves at all, but the “low point drain” which, in irony of ironies, drained the water from my trailer to prevent any further damage. So, all said and done, crisis averted, and all has been repaired!

Spray feature.