Soap.


Is too clean dangerous? This is a compelling article that makes you consider (or re-consider) the ingredients in your shower gel and bath soap. It’s strange, so many of the ingredients and additives that are banned elsewhere in the world are still very much in our soap and personal care products.
Read the original story about triclosan at Quartz.

<http://qz.com/779681/the-new-fda-rule-on-triclosan-a-banned-chemical-in-anti-bacterial-soap-is-still-in-practically-every-other-american-bath-product/>

If nothing else, this story should give pause about using commercial products and perhaps prompt you to consider making some soap of your own!

My friend makes her own soap (which is fantastic) and the main ingredient is coconut oil. She uses the recipe you can find on Mommypotumus. 

Rigid Vacuum Cleaner Repair

I bought a RIDGID Vacuum Cleaner this past year as an investment. It’s a wet-dry shop-capable type that is quite large (too large, actually), but is up to the task of vacuuming a plastic bag stuck high up in a neighboring tree as well as emptying the contents of a beehive… both things the vacuum has done admirably.

This past spring, I was vacuuming my car, and pulled the vacuum across my driveway toward me and the wheel/leg snapped right off.

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For a $200+ vacuum, I was pretty angry about that.

So, I wrote to the RIDGID folks, and without any question, they sent out a replacement set of wheels, next day air.

Great service, and now, a great vacuum in perfect working order.

Nicely done, RIDGID. Based on this experience, and the durability of the vacuum, I would strongly recommend RIDGID.

How to wash anything made from wood.

A long time ago, my grandmother taught me how to do a deep spring cleaning and we washed hardwood floors and all the wood furniture in the house. I still use this method to this day, and it’s easy, foolproof and keeps wood from drying out.

 

1991

You’ll need:

  • 3-4 rags. Old flannels or old towels cut into 12 inch squares work best.
  • Two buckets filled about 3/4 of the way with lukewarm water. (I remember the day my grandmother showed me this method, I didn’t know what lukewarm meant, so if you don’t know: it means it’s warm to the touch, but not hot.)
  • About a cup or so of white vinegar. Pour it into bucket #1.
  • Murphy’s Oil Soap about a 1/4 of a cup. Pour it into bucket #2.

Wash down the wood with the water vinegar solution and while it’s still damp, wash down with the Murphy’s Oil Soap solution.

After the wood has dried, buff to a shine with a dry rag. You can use polish (like Old English or Pledge), but it’s not necessary.

I’ve learned, over time, that other cleansers tend to attract dirt over time. This method won’t, and the oil in Murphy’s keeps wood nourished and looking great!

 

A New (Little) Shed

When you only have 68 square feet of living space, every foot counts. Having a jug of kitty litter reduces your living space by 2%. A garbage can, another 2%, a pair of shoes, another 2%. While I am not complaining about my small space, every item and every centimeter counts.

I have been thinking for a while about building (or buying) a shed…and I found this little one at Lowes. It was surprisingly simple to put together and seems decently sturdy. It’s really made for two garbage bins, but I’m using it to store a lawn mower, some outdoor chairs, a hose, and some kitty litter.

Truthfully. I could probably fit all those things in the rear (under bed) storage area, but I’ve filled that with fiberglass insulation, which keeps the airstream toasty warm.

Best of all, this little shed snaps apart and folds flat, so when I move, it will move with me.

So…one more improvement checked off the list!!

Spring Cleaning

Time for a little bit of spring cleaning. Now with Molly living in Florence part time, there seems to be evidence of cat everywhere. In such tiny quarters, a little mess goes a long way, so I brought out the big guns: my grandma’s vacuum cleaner (that I have had forever.)

Angie's Eureka Empress Vacuum Cleaner

This vacuum cleaner will be 60 years old next year. It is—without reservation—the most trusty appliance I own. It needs zero maintenance. Works like a charm, and cleans really well. Most amazing: I can still find bags that fit!

In any case, Florence is a little more tidy and ready for summer… at least inside. Outside maintenance starts happening next week. That’s when I’ll tackle the hot water tank that seems to have stopped working.