How I Learned to Cut Dovetails By Hand  – Core77

When I was in 6th grade, I took a summer activity workshop that focused on a different skill each day. One of the days was focused on wood shop and I made a simple toolbox that my mom still uses. I enjoyed it. I never tried woodworking in any significant way until I was in architecture school, twenty years later.

During the first week of classes, the shopmaster (who was a very kind and pleasant person) gave us a comprehensive “safety training” which consisted of three days of completely freaking me out about using any  tool… ever. The three day “training” culminated in being forced to use a table saw during which the entire session focused on “kickback.” (Kickback, in case you don’t know is when the grain of the wood gets angry at the teeth of the saw and essentially uses the blade as the force to project the wood with insane force away from the blade.) The most freaky thing about the whole experience was the 2×4 sticking out of the wall behind the table saw as a warning to “pay attention” while you were using the saw.

What I learned from the training was that anytime I needed to use any tool beyond a pen or a T-square, that I should wear a black suit and look confused, and that someone would do the work for me. So, while my colleagues were learning to cut dovetail joints and cast molten metal, I struggled to put together a simple wooden box, paranoid that I’d cut a finger off, or crack my skull open with a flying 2×4.

 

I’ve wanted to be able to hand-cut dovetails for years, and I’m proud to say I now can! I recently took “Hand Tools Skills – Mastering Dovetailing,” a four-session class at Tools for Working Wood in Brooklyn. This is a review of that class.

Source: How I Learned to Cut Dovetails By Hand  – Core77

Fixing a broken iPhone screen.

This past week, my Dad accidentally dropped my Mom’s iPhone on the ground and smashed the screen. My Mom always has a case on her iPhone, so we were all really surprised that the screen was not only shattered, but also had big white lines running from top to bottom.

I hopped over to the Apple Store and picked up a new phone for my Mom, but I wondered… could I repair this one? I searched around the Apple website and found a quote for $129 to repair the screen. After typing in all my information, the “estimated cost” was $399, not $129. Why that was the case, I’m not really sure, because Apple didn’t ask any other information about the phone except for the serial number and my address. After shelling out $800 for a new phone, I decided that another $400 wasn’t worth it.

As an experiment, I stumbled across this tutorial at iFixit. The process looked straightforward if not annoying and tedious, but I decided to order the screen and tools for $54.95 from iFixit.

The broken iPhone was a Space Grey color, but iFixit was out of the black bezeled screen, so I bought a white one instead. The box arrived today, and I was curious to see the tools. I opened the package, and thought… I’m going to try to do this.

And so, I did.

It’s amazing to see inside the iPhone that you carry around each day. So many tiny little components. It’s truly a feat of amazing engineering.

 

Another shot of the inside of the iPhone with iFixit tools at the side.

The process required a pair of magnifying glasses (+1.00) for me, and a bright light (thank you, left overs from architecture school), but within about an hour, I had disassembled the iPhone, and after taking a look around to satisfy my curiosity, re-assembled the phone. It wasn’t tedious, it wasn’t difficult, and shockingly, the phone works… really well. And, best of all, it’s a one-of-a-kind phone. Space grey back and white front with a black Touch ID! Not many of those floating around!

It works!
Like really works!
A custom space grey iPhone SE with a white bezel and black Touch ID! Works as good as the day it was born!

So, thanks to Sam Lionheart and the iFixit team for their great product, great service, and easy to understand tutorials and step-by-step guide. I didn’t ever feel lost or confused. If you’re handy and in need of an iPhone repair, give them a try!

And if anyone needs a custom iPhone SE, let me know! It’s for sale.